The village, which is claimed by Israeli authorities as "state land", was first destroyed in 2010 and has since been rebuilt every time it was targetted.

Israeli military demolished a school in the occupied West Bank village of Masafer Yatta on Wednesday,  Nov. 23.
Israeli military demolished a school in the occupied West Bank village of Masafer Yatta on Wednesday, Nov. 23. (Mahmoud Illean / AP)

Israeli authorities have demolished a Palestinian Bedouin village in the southern Negev region for the 210th time, a Tel Aviv-based NGO said, in signs of growing Israeli atrocities on the besieged people.

 "The Israeli authorities demolished the Al Araqib village for the 210th time," Aziz al Touri, a member of the Committee for the Defense of Al Araqib, told Anadolu Agency on Monday.

Al Touri confirmed that the villagers intended to rebuild their destroyed dwellings and other structures.

The Israeli authorities had demolished the village houses in mid-November.

Homes in Al Araqib, inhabited by 22 Palestinian families, are built of wood, plastic, and corrugated iron.

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The village was first destroyed in 2010, but since then, it has been rebuilt every time it was destroyed. Israeli authorities claim that the village's location falls under "state land".

Zochrot, a Tel Aviv-based NGO, said in a recent report that Al Araqib village was first built during the Ottoman period, and residents purchased its lands.

Israeli authorities seek to seize control of the lands and expel its residents, with dozens of villages and Bedouin communities facing the same threat in the Negev area, according to Zochrot.

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Source: TRTWorld and agencies