The world is speaking out following a Saudi cleric's remarks that women should be barred from driving as they had "a quarter of the brainpower of men."

In this file photo, a woman drives a car on a highway in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, as part of a campaign to defy Saudi Arabias ban on women driving on March 29,2014.
In this file photo, a woman drives a car on a highway in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, as part of a campaign to defy Saudi Arabias ban on women driving on March 29,2014. ( AP)

Saudi Arabia might finally allow women to drive — and Saudis have a great deal to say about it.

In a drastic turnaround, Saudi King Salman on Tuesday ordered that women be allowed to drive cars, but in accordance with the Islamic laws, state media reported.


The hashtag #SaudiWomenCanDrive trended on Twitter:

Its repeal comes after years of protest and resistance from female activists, many of whom were jailed.

More than half the country are aged under 25. And Saudi's Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, the king's son and the architect of new national masterplan Vision 2030, is trying to cater to youthful aspirations.

Internationally, this draconian law was seen as a symbol of repression of women in the kingdom. 

Its repeal comes after years of protest and resistance from female activists, many of whom were jailed.

Source: TRTWorld and agencies