Egypt imposed state of emergency after deadly bombings of churches in April 2017 and has since routinely extended it at three-month intervals.

The state of emergency granted Egyptian authorities sweeping powers to make arrests and crackdown on what they call enemies of the state.
The state of emergency granted Egyptian authorities sweeping powers to make arrests and crackdown on what they call enemies of the state. (Amr Abdallah Dalsh / Reuters Archive)

Egyptian President Abdel Fattah el Sisi has ended the state of emergency in the country for the first time in years.

"I decided for the first time in years to cancel the extension of the state of emergency throughout the country," Sisi said on Facebook late on Monday.

"I am glad that we share together the moment that we have long sought with struggle and hard work. Egypt has become, thanks to its great people and loyal men, an oasis of security and stability in the region," he added.

READ MORE: Egypt extending the state of emergency makes no difference to freedom

On April 10, 2017, the Egyptian parliament approved declaring a state of emergency for three months to "confront the dangers of terrorism” in response to bombings that targeted two churches in the north of the country, killing at least 45 people. 

Daesh claimed responsibility for the attacks.

Under the state of emergency, which has consistently been renewed in accordance with the constitution, Egyptian authorities have the right to evacuate areas, impose a curfew, take strict security measures and punish violators with imprisonment.

READ MORE: Egypt's Sisi ratifies emergency law amendments sparking rights concerns

Source: TRTWorld and agencies