"There is such a possibility. Its conditions were determined by both the Russian president and foreign minister," says Zamir Kabulov, Russia's special envoy for the South Asian country.

Russian President Vladimir Putin has allowed the grain to be reserved for Afghanistan, says  Zamir Kabulov.
Russian President Vladimir Putin has allowed the grain to be reserved for Afghanistan, says Zamir Kabulov. (AA Archive)

Russia's special envoy for Afghanistan has said Moscow may recognise the interim Taliban government and has reserved grain for the South Asian country to stave off the possible food crisis there. 

"There is such a possibility. Its conditions were determined by both the Russian president and foreign minister," Zamir Kabulov told the Russian state TV Channel One Russia.

Kabulov said that Russia will not follow the US and other countries over recognition of the interim Taliban government.

He said the Taliban is willing to cooperate with Russia and work in line with accepted international rules.

Kabulov said the deputy trade minister of the Taliban government will pay a visit to Moscow, adding Afghanistan wants to purchase some products and Russian President Vladimir Putin has allowed the grain to be reserved for Afghanistan.

READ MORE: Russia, China, Iran agree to work with Taliban for 'regional stability'

No world recognition yet

After the withdrawal of foreign forces ended a 20-year war last year, the Western-backed government and its security bodies collapsed in the face of Taliban military advances. 

World governments do not recognise the new Taliban set up.

The UN has warned that more than one million children in Afghanistan under the age of five will likely face the most severe form of malnutrition this year. 

It's a result of worsening living conditions caused by droughts and extreme poverty. 

Many aid agencies have already cut off billions in finances for the Taliban-run government, leaving many families struggling to make ends meet. 

Pakistan has called for engagement with the Taliban, saying the world cannot afford a humanitarian crisis.

But Pakistan's Foreign Minister Bilawal Bhutto Zardari said the Taliban should heed international community concerns on rights and security.

READ MORE: World Bank: Some 37% Afghan families don't have enough money to buy food

Source: AA