Police operation began just after midnight and officers were still raiding the houses of supporters late in the day, says Fawad Chaudhry, a spokesperson for Khan's Tehreek-e-Insaf party.

Ousted PM Imran Khan contends his removal was the result of a US-organised plot.
Ousted PM Imran Khan contends his removal was the result of a US-organised plot. (Reuters Archive)

The key opposition party led by recently ousted PM Imran Khan has accused police of detaining dozens of its supporters in an attempt to foil a planned protest seeking to force Pakistan's government into calling early elections.

Fawad Chaudhry, a spokesperson for Khan's Tehreek-e-Insaf party, said late on Monday the police operation began just after midnight and officers were still raiding the houses of supporters late in the day.

Khan took to Twitter, condemning the arrests of his supporters.

No government official was immediately available for comment.

The development came two days after Khan urged his supporters to gather in Islamabad on Wednesday for a demonstration that he said would continue until the government announced a date for snap elections.

READ MORE: Pakistan's Imran Khan calls for march on Islamabad to press early polls

Khan accuses US in interview 

Khan, who served as prime minister for over three and half years, was ousted by a no-confidence vote in parliament in April. He was replaced as prime minister by Shehbaz Sharif.

Khan contends his removal was the result of a US-organised plot. Washington has denied the claim, and Sharif calls it a pack of lies.

In an interview with CNN on Monday, Khan repeated his claims, accusing US Assistant Secretary of State for Central and South Asia Donald Lu of orchestrating Khan's ouster.

Khan said Lu had threatened Pakistan's ex-envoy to the US, Asad Majeed, of "consequences" if Khan was not removed in a no-trust vote. 

"Imagine telling the ambassador of a country of 220 million people that you get rid of your prime minister," Khan said.

READ MORE: Q&A: New Pakistan PM will be 'more receptive to conversations' with the US

Source: TRTWorld and agencies