Yusaku Maezawa, a space enthusiast who made his wealth in online fashion, and his production assistant, Yozo Hirano, will spend 12 days aboard the orbital station.

Maezawa and Hirano are scheduled to spend 12 days in space
Maezawa and Hirano are scheduled to spend 12 days in space (Reuters)

A Japanese billionaire and his producer have rocketed to space as the first self-paying space tourists in more than a decade.

Fashion tycoon Yusaku Maezawa and producer Yozo Hirano, who plans to film his mission, blasted off for the International Space Station in a Russian Soyuz spacecraft along with Russian cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin on Wednesday.

“I would like to look at the Earth from space. I would like to experience the opportunity to feel weightlessness,” Maezawa said during a pre-flight news conference on Tuesday. 

“And I also have a personal expectation: I’m curious how the space will change me, how I will change after this space flight.”

The trio lifted off as scheduled at 12:38 p.m. (0738 GMT) aboard Soyuz MS-20 from the Russia-leaded Baikonur launch facility in Kazakhstan.

Maezawa and Hirano are scheduled to spend 12 days in space.

The price of the trip hasn’t been disclosed.

READ MORE: SpaceX names Japanese billionaire as first private tourist to Moon

Shared experience

A company that organised the flight said Maezawa compiled a list of 100 things to do in space after asking the public for ideas.

The list includes “simple things about daily life to maybe some other fun activities, to more serious questions as well,” Space Adventures President Tom Shelley said.

“His intention is to try to share the experience of what it means to be in space with the general public,” Shelley explained.

Maezawa made his fortune in retail fashion, launching Japan’s largest online fashion mall, Zozotown. Forbes magazine estimated his net worth at $2 billion.

The tycoon has also booked a flyby around the moon aboard Elon Musk’s Starship that is tentatively scheduled for 2023. He’ll be joined on that trip by eight contest winners.

READ MORE: Japan space tourist says moon training 'shouldn't be too hard'

Source: AP