The mural was defined as "provocative" and "unacceptable" by the Auvergne-Rhone-Alpes region, cutting $11,149 of financial support for the Grenoble Street Art Festival.

France has long been criticised for discriminatory policies against Muslims, with the spotlight on women wearing hijabs.
France has long been criticised for discriminatory policies against Muslims, with the spotlight on women wearing hijabs. (Reuters)

The French region of Auvergne-Rhone-Alpes has suspended subsidies for a street-art festival in Grenoble because of a mural of a woman wearing a hijab.

The region on Thursday said in a statement that the mural was "provocative" and "unacceptable".

It argued that it only benefits extremists, fuelling violence and hatred and said subsidies planned for the "Street Art Fest Grenoble Alpes" was canceled.

Media reports said the mural was drawn eight months ago and a decision was made to cancel the subsidy although the mural had nothing to do with the festival.

Festival director Jerome Catz said the reason for the cancelation of $11,149 (€10,000) in financial support for the festival is political and it happened before the presidential election that will be held in April.

READ MORE: Mosques vandalised, Muslims targeted with racist graffiti in France

Defaced with black paint

The mural called "Bad Religion?" was made by an artist known as Goin on a wall in rue Hébert, Grenoble.

Catz said that the artist who drew the mural wanted to draw attention to the fact that some people are discriminated against because of their religion.

After the suspension of subsidies, it was learned that the mural was defaced with black paint.

The woman's face, as well as the yellow star with the inscription "Muslim" on the woman’s chest, are now black.

France has long been criticised for discriminatory policies against Muslims, with the spotlight on women wearing hijabs.

READ MORE: France votes to ban Muslim women from playing sports with headscarves

Source: TRTWorld and agencies