Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador urges supporters to converge on streets on Sunday — the first such march led by a Mexican president in at least 40 years, experts say.

Lopez Obrador, who enjoys an approval rating of nearly 60 percent, has his eye on the next presidential election in 2024.
Lopez Obrador, who enjoys an approval rating of nearly 60 percent, has his eye on the next presidential election in 2024. (Reuters Archive)

Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador has called on his supporters to take to the streets this weekend for a march that he will lead marking four years in office.

Sunday's mass mobilisation comes after tens of thousands of people protested in Mexico City on November 13 against Lopez Obrador's proposed electoral reform.

It will be the first such march led by a Mexican president in at least four decades, according to experts.

The aim is to celebrate the government's so-called "Fourth Transformation" reform agenda and the "transformation of Mexico," Lopez Obrador said.

"I invite all the people, all those who can attend," including government ministers and lawmakers, he told reporters.

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Electoral reform plan

Lopez Obrador, who enjoys an approval rating of nearly 60 percent, has his eye on the next presidential election in 2024, although he is barred by the constitution from serving more than one six-year term.

Two of his close allies and potential successors, Mexico City Mayor Claudia Sheinbaum and Foreign Minister Marcelo Ebrard, are expected to march alongside Lopez Obrador on Sunday.

Lopez Obrador dismissed this month's protest against his electoral reform plan as an attempt by opponents to return to corrupt old ways.

Opponents fear the proposed changes would undermine the National Electoral Institute (INE), the independent body which organises the country's elections.

Lopez Obrador alleges that the INE endorsed fraud when he ran unsuccessfully for the presidency in 2006 and 2012, before winning in 2018.

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Source: AFP